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20121201
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PBS
Dec 6, 2012 3:00pm PST
city facing rising sea levels and the next big storm. >> if sandy were to come close or directly into norfolk i think we'd all be in big trouble. >> brown: we assess the latest diplomatic moves to end syria's war, as secretary of state hillary clinton meets with russia's foreign minister. >> woodruff: and ray suarez has the story of a program that aims to put students at low-achieving schools on a path to high school graduation. >> we're here to make things better. we're here to tutor kids. we're here to make sure that they stay on track. we are here to make sure that they graduate. we want to prepare them for high school. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for
PBS
Dec 10, 2012 2:30pm PST
, and look for a starting point. end of april, the city had the momentous thing, the riots that followed the rodney king case verdict. about a story out of that, one of many unsolved murders harry bosch worked on back then. because of the events that occurred, he was unable to solve the case. 20 years later, he goes back and hopefully bring justice to the case. tavis: you were writing for the l.a. times had at the time of the riots, so you wrote about the riots for "the l.a. times." looking back, coming to your real life, what do you make, looking back at that moment? >> it was probably the most surreal moment, he but maybe the most important moment for me as a reporter. i was a reporter a couple more years after that, and then i was back to writing books. to see what happened to the city, to be surprised by what happened -- it was a good lesson learned. not understanding the pressures that were underneath the surface of this town. it makes you think about it. it is a question in the book. 20 years later, how far have we come? could it happen again if the right circumstances are there? i
PBS
Dec 7, 2012 7:30pm PST
a high-profile misconduct lawsuit involving a group of cops known as the riders. now city leaders are hoping a last-minute tentative deal will avoid a federal takeover of the department. matthai kuruvila, i know you've been covering this story. what are the details of this settlement and what does it mean for the department? >> well, what this agreement involves is an agreement between the police union, the city and professors attorneys who filed this original civil rights lawsuit. what they've decided on is creating a compliance director. now, this would be a quasi mayor of oakland in a sense in that he gets to -- he or she would have the power to fire the police chief with the court approval. they would have the power to direct the city administrators. those are two things currently only the mayor has. it's limited in scope in that it would only effect the reform tasks that are incomplete for the police department. the city had been very concerned that this potential receiver, or federal receiver, would have oversight over the entire police department. so all -- so all three sid
PBS
Dec 18, 2012 12:00am PST
york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: tonight our focus is on what can be done so that the tragedy at sandy hook elementary school does not happen again. on friday december 14th a gunman killed 26 people, 20 of them were children between the ages of 6 and 7. it is the second deadliest mass shooting in american history. the killings have revived the debate on gun control and demonstrated the need to rethink our approach to mental illness. president obama traveled to the bereaved town to attend a community vigil and console families. here is a part of the president's address to the grieving people of that town, and to the nation. >> no single law, no set of laws can eliminate evil or prevent every senseless act of violence in our society but that can't an excuse for inaction. surely we did:do better than this. if there's even one step we can take to save another child or another parent or another town, from the grief that's visited tucson, aurora, and oak creek and newtown, and communities from columbine to blacksberg before that, then surely we have an obligation to try. >> rose: jo
PBS
Dec 12, 2012 4:00pm PST
a living. this is what has become of the ancient city. he has lost his home and his job, so every day he sifts through filth and stench so he can feed his children. life is really bad. there is no work and money. that is why i come here to collect and rubbish. this revolution was supposedly about a better future and a better tomorrow, and many residents still cling to that hope, and they believe the ongoing fighting, not just in the city but also in the countryside, is worth the struggle. a petrol now comes from a barrel at the side of the road. three times the price it was before the revolution. people queued for hours in the cold for bread, now 10 times more expensive and in short supply. the bombardment has subsided, but the suffering has not, and the fighting has moved elsewhere. we joined the rebels on an operation, running across open ground to avoid sniper fire. now the fighters are laying siege to an infantry training school. the free syrian army controls most of the land here, and so the 300 government troops inside know they are surrounded. no reinforcements to come. the rebels
PBS
Dec 26, 2012 12:00am PST
by these funders. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> charlie: charles dickens the great british writer was born in 1812. his 200th birthday is being celebrated including at new york's morgan library. >> on assignment for charlie rose at new york's museum of library and museum. peepierpont morgan was an averae collector of dickens. the museum holds the largest collection in america. we are joined by dr. the curator and department head of literacy and historical manuscripts at the morgan library. >> here we are in mr. morgan's study. we're looking at the first installments of david copperfield. one schilling would have got you your monthly part. and here is the beginning part of the booklets and it is just page after page after page of advertisements for books and pills and remedies and all kinds of things. here you have the original illustrations that accompany each part separated by tissue, of course, so they didn't smudge each other. here's the very first page of the narrative, whether i turn out to be the hero of my own life
PBS
Dec 5, 2012 7:00pm PST
-quarter earnings. is this gloomy news from citi the beginning of other companies doing the same? suzanne pratt reports. >> reporter: 11,000 jobs are a lot of layoffs, even for a bank as huge as citi. and there could be more. that's because the monster firm is still struggling to recover from the great recession even though it has fired a lot of other workers in the last few years. the thing is, citi has a new c.e.o. in michael corbat, and experts say he's anxious to make his mark, even if that includes cutting staff. and the need to slim down is not unique to citi; it's industry- wide. a financial industry runs into huge problems. it happened in the '30s, and it happened in the last five years. when you go through these periods, you go through a lot of change. that industry is now trying to figure out what is the right size of the industry. >> reporter: still, economists say citi's action today is not the start of a new wave of mass layoffs across corporate america. the nation's job market may not be robust, but it's not frozen, either. in fact, today, the payroll firm a.d.p. reported 118,000
PBS
Dec 9, 2012 5:00pm PST
owning a newspaper and radio and tv stations in the same big city. thus he would give the massive media companies free rein to devour more of the competition. the chairman is julius genachowski, appointed to the job by president barack obama. now, the fcc tried to pull this same stunt under a republican chairman back in the second term of george w. bush, but at hearings held around the country an angry public fought back. >> we told you a year ago when you came to seattle that media consolidation is a patently bad idea. no "ifs," "ands," or "buts" about it. so with all due respect i ask you, what part of that didn't you understand? >> i'm a republican and i'm a capitalist, but some areas of our private sector must be regulated. freedom of information is too important, we must be proactive in protecting that fundamental freedom. >> if the fcc is here wanting to know if chicago's residents are being well served, the answer is no. if local talent is being covered, the answer is no. if community issues are being treated sensitively, the answer is no. if minority groups are getting the cover
PBS
Dec 27, 2012 3:00pm PST
of a glorious past. and some parts of the city bustle with holiday energy. but not far away: closed-up storefronts. and, further below the surface, this: a health clinic set up by the greek branch of the international aid group, doctors of the world to serve the country's newly poor. dr. nikitis kanakis is its director. >> brown: kanakis group, in fact, had to cut back some of its work in africa because of the needs at home. here in perama, unemployment tops 50% as the shrinking economy has crippled much of the local shipping industry. at the same time, the deeply indebted greek government has made dramatic budget cuts, including to health benefits. the combination has left many here without access to private or public care. and that's meant a stunning rise in disease and mortality rates. >> brown: economists, of course, speak of a different kind of necessary medicine: the kind a deeply indebted nation must take. the price for living and consuming well beyond its means for far too long. >> the medicine is necessary. it was, though, delivered very abruptly. >> brown: as a government
PBS
Dec 14, 2012 4:00pm PST
data from u.s. cities compared to other cities in canada and other places, they're not radically different. what is most distinctive is that our violent crime is far more lethal and that is largely due to the fact that we have a rather porous system from trying to keep guns from dangerous system. >> connecticut has some of the strictest gun control laws in america get as you suggest it is very easy for weapons to move across this country, in my experience come whenever one of these mass shootings happens, it does not lead necessarily to tighter gun control. >> sadly, that is the case. typically, when such incidents occur, you have different agitations of those events. you have one set of individuals who say that we have to do something to strengthen our gun laws. then you have another group of individuals who say that we made it easier for teachers to have guns in public schools or what i consider to be rather fantasy come rather bad ideas. there are too many people who have this notion that the way we are going to solve this problem is to simply have more citizens armed and read
PBS
Dec 19, 2012 4:00pm PST
killed and others wounded. the shootings followed similar incidents in pakistan's largest city of karachi, where four female health workers were shot dead. across the country, authorities have suspended the polio eradication drive for the time being. many who want their children vaccinated are disappointed. >> i want to get my son back, but there is no one here. >> we headed to a carracci neighborhood, where a health worker was shot dead on tuesday. this is a slum area often considered too dangerous for the police and paramilitary troops to penetrate. two workers were killed in the houses behind me. it is too dangerous to go there, but we have come to that area hoping to speak to the victims' families. the anti polio campaigners fromlive the short distance where they were killed. the family was devastated. gunmen shot at her family while they were visiting. she says may face resistance in their efforts. >> the women want their children to be vaccinated, but some are warned against it by their man, who says the program is a conspiracy to spoil future generations. the women say this is the
PBS
Dec 24, 2012 4:00pm PST
, the world's oldest city is another place that people visit. there is obviously east jerusalem and the old city. one of the things he was saying that he might push in the future is walking, hiking, that sort of thing, activity holidays. >> all right, from manger square, thank you very much indeed. we will just show you briefly these pictures from the midnight mass. in many parts of the world, the 24th, the night before christmas really is the most important holy day of the year, and we can take you now to the vatican. pope benedict is holding a midnight mass at st. peter's basilica in the vatican. it is not yet midnight in italy, but because of the pope's health and to give him time to rest before he delivers the christmas day message, this year, the ceremony began at 9:00 gmt, and that would be 10:00 in italy, which was just about one hour ago. the pope conducting this mess and also lighting the candle of peace, which he did earlier and put on the balcony of his apartment window, which overlooks st. peter's square. this is one of the largest churches anywhere in the world. there are touri
PBS
Dec 26, 2012 4:00pm PST
into gangs of killing and destruction. the army has destroyed cities and towns. it has committed massacres against our people, who took to the streets to demand freedom. long live syria, free and europe. >> he also defected from the bashar al-assad government. before that he held several high-ranking posts including the ambassador to sweden. i asked him how significant it is. >> it is very significant because one of the highest- ranking officers that have affected so far, and this man is the head of the military police and he must know a lot of things that have been going on by the army, invading the cities and killing civilians and bombarding the area with chemical weapons. he has said homs was bombed with chemical weapons. this is his statement. i think he was in a position to do this because you have all the reports coming to him. >> is it really that significant given that bashar al-assad still can count the military in multiples of tens of thousands? he is getting help from the russians, the iranians, and also has fallen out of lebanon. he looks pretty secure and appears to be acting
PBS
Dec 28, 2012 4:00pm PST
in the previous year. one man knows a lot about that subject, new york city's deputy police commissioner, paul brown, who joins us live right now. mr. brown, congratulations. how have you done it? >> thank you, mainly through 35,000 men and women in uniform, but particularly through something called operation at attack where we send as many uniformed police officers as possible into areas where we have seen spikes and violence, particularly shootings. >> that sounds almost like a back to basics campaign. why was the decision taken to go in that direction? >> well, it started with mayor bloomberg and commissioner kelly coming into the office right after 9/11 with a deep downturn in the economy, less tax revenue. we lost 6000 police officers through attrition, we have 6000 fewer now than we had then. that forced us to take a look at how we deploy officers into the city. instead of dividing them up as we usually did into 76 precincts, we focused better on defining exactly where the most violent crimes were happening and putting the biggest number of officers there, the biggest bang for the block.
PBS
Dec 28, 2012 12:00am PST
communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: let me start off. tell me what makes -- what makes a great restaurant? how do you -- >> well, what makes a great restaurant i don't know exactly. a great restaurant i think is where the owner and the chef gives all the love he can. >> rose: when does your day start? >> ooh, sometimes 8:00, sometimes 9:00, sometimes 7:00. >> rose: what's the first thing you do? >> oh, it changes a little bit. i stop at the office for 15 minutes and then i go down and look if everything is holding and look -- >> rose: see i had this impression of all of you at the fish market at 4:00 a.m. everyday saying "these are the finest and the freshest" and you're poring over the fish, picking them up and deciding "only this is good enough for my customers, my clientele." >> oh, of course, we are a very aware and we do buy the best and i think what makes a great rest vaunt the cooking also. of course the service, the ambience, and for that we buy the best, we don't wake up at 4:00 in the morning because we finished at midnight every night. but
PBS
Dec 16, 2012 3:30pm PST
's 300. a big part of that, in my judgment, what has been introduced in new york city, stop and frisk, where the police are allowed to go ahead, look at somebody who they consider suspicious, check and see whether the man has a gun, and that has really made a difference in terms of what's happened in new york. it's not the only thing but one of those factors. interestingly enough, 91% of the people would are shot are people from the minority communities. so they're the ones who are the most -- sadly to stay, one who get the worst of it, the brunt of it. so this is something that i think is absolutely critical in terms of getting gun control across the united states and diminishing the amount of murders. >> but tough same -- you had the same gun law, didn't you, when you had 2400 killed as 400 killed? >> no, we did not. >> you had a new gun law? >> stop and frisk -- >> i'm not talking about stop and frisk. i'm talking gun show -- >> hold on. >> the gun show loophole allows people to sell guns at gun shows without doing the background checks, and there have been no efforts, or no succes
PBS
Dec 31, 2012 3:00pm PST
. >> woodruff: from boston, hari sreenivasan reports on a city- wide effort to keep kids engaged in education through meaningful work experiences. >> we're starting at the very early ages to try to help young people speak. that is a direct relationship to being successful in school and being successful in your life >> woodruff: and we close out 2012 with two takes on history, first, a look at the emancipation proclamation on the eve of the 150th anniversary of president lincoln's action to end slavery and the civil war. >> woodruff: plus michael beschloss and richard norton smith talk about potential historical turning points of the past year. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station
PBS
Dec 5, 2012 3:00pm PST
jobs are in consumer banking. the move comes less than two months since a shakeup at citi ousting former c.e.o., vikram pandit. he was succeeded by michael corbat. the bank nearly collapsed during the crisis and ultimately received bailouts totaling $45 billion, money that citi has since repaid. roben farzhad has long watched the changes at citi for bloomberg "businessweek" and joins us again tonight. roben, welcome. today we heard that stocks soared on the news of these layoffs. what does that tell us about what was going on at citi? >> it's sad, actually. citigroup is know-- you could say the financial crisis is over but in the throes of an existential crisis. it doesn't know what it wants to be. investors have been clamoring for a while for citigroup to simplify, to shed payrolls, to be good at something. it does everything, but it isn't market leading, necessarily, in any one category. and by and large, they got the layoffs, at least the beginning round of layoffs that they wanted today. >> ifill: we know many of these layoffs are noin the u.s., but i assume part of the relati
PBS
Dec 20, 2012 12:00am PST
from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: george osborne is here. he is britain's chancellor of the exchequer. he has been called the austerity chancellor. he continues to lead the increasingly controversial austerity process. in a piece called "god sieve the british economy" in the upcoming "new york times" magazine adam davidson writes "in the past two years the united states has experienced a steep downturn followed by steady though horrendously slow upturn. the british economy, however, is profoundly stuck. the u.k. has been put on negative watch on three largest credit rating agencies. the european union is britain's largest trading partner, europe's economy remains on prepares you footing despite several months of relative calm and there's a growing debate about whether the u.k. should lead the e.u. earlier this month we covered the "economist" magazine read "good-bye europe, look what happened when britain left the e.u. " i'm pleased to have george osborne back on this program and back at this table. >> thank you very much. >> rose: you're in new york city
PBS
Dec 17, 2012 2:30pm PST
to see some of this on display? >> one of the evidence i was telling you was burned up in mexico city. -- of its i was telling you about was bird apply in mexico city. one was stolen. the ones i have been on exhibit. they have been on exhibit for eight years on the -- and the rock-and-roll hall of fame museum has carried them. they have been all around the world. they opened up at the victoria and albert museum in london. that is so great. "edgown that we'v wore on sullian show," the array of colors are beautiful. they're in pretty good condition. it has been 50 years. tavis: tell me about the fashion, about the hair, the clothes. so much of the image of the supremes how to do with not just the sound but the look and you work that thing. >> we all loved glamour. we really did. we were playing dress up in our moms' clothes. a lot of people like lena horne we looked at as children and young girls and the glamour is what we wanted to do. we went to motown and what berry gordy noticed about this even though he turned down, we work the age of 16 -- were 15. they noticed how we were classy
PBS
Dec 17, 2012 4:00pm PST
. deserted. it feels like a road to nowhere. then we arrived in the middle of the jungle. a city is rising. this is going to be the new capital. this has to be one of the most extraordinary construction projects i have ever seen. i am on the roof of a foreign debt 50 room -- 450 room, 5 star theater that comes to the convention center and carved out of the jungle and 18 hold championship golf course. it is a spectacular vanity project in a country where most people live on barely $1 a day. equatorial, guinea is a dictatorship. his family has been accused of rampant corruption. has hadident's son assets worth 1 million euros seized by the french government. oil and gas are the keys to understanding the regime. editorial beginning -- equity torial guinea life expectancy barely topped 50. public dissent is a dangerous. anger is close to the surface. >> the people are suffering. all the oil money is taken by the president's family. no one can say anything. if you do the secret police would come to arrest you. >> the president gave me a rare interview. he is 70 but in no mood for retirement. >>
PBS
Dec 20, 2012 4:00pm PST
in violence in the country's major cities and that the conflict is becoming increasingly sectarian in nature. it warns that more and more foreigners are joining both sides in the fighting. now to the ongoing controversy surrounding the attack on the u.s. mission in libya. today, representatives from the state department appeared before u.s. lawmakers. officials acknowledged that some very painful lessons were learned from the benghazi assault in which america's ambassador and three others died could this comes in the same week that a scathing report faulted management failures at the state department. in response, the head of the diplomatic security bureau resigned. what are those painful lessons that you think that the state department has learned from the attack. >> some of the lessons they have learned in their high-risk missions, they need to have more security. that is not as mean more security guards come it means better and tougher buildings and more importantly they need to look at intelligence in a different way. they cannot expect to have a warning of an attack that will come, they
PBS
Dec 21, 2012 4:00pm PST
, trucks loaded with people's belongings make their way through the streets of the city. human rights organizations said that in the country as a whole, some 2.5 million people are not displaced. that is leaving aside all those who fled to neighboring countries. at this mass in damascus, the new syrian orthodox patriarch called for an end to the violence. >> we in antioch, he said, have got to inspire all parties in flaming the conflict to lay down their weapons they get nothing but destruction and devastation. for now, the conflict and deteriorating weather conditions inflict increasing misery on civilians. the prospect of peace through dialogue seems beyond reach. >> for more news around the world, there have been clashes in egypt was the second city of alexandria on the eve of the second stage of voting on the country's controversial constitution. islamists who backed the constitution were met by smaller groups of opposition protesters. police fired tear gas and cordoned off the area. italy's prime minister has resigned, meaning the country will go to the polls in february. mario m
PBS
Dec 24, 2012 2:30pm PST
am stimulated to right by the turmoil of the city, by the confusion and problems, but i am also nearest by the solitude, the closest to the nature region the closeness to nature. people say, what does wilderness mean when you are starving? i get that, but i also does not mean to destroy the wilderness, because when you are not starving you are going to want a place to go and your kids and grandkids are going to want a place to go, so i see it as my responsibility to take care of the problems in the city, but to take care of the wilderness for future generations. we have to. tavis: the love you have given is boundless, and i am glad to have you on this program. this is so unfair to have our life so rich you cannot even scratched the surface. there is a book you can pick up. it is called "a natural woman, written by the one and only carole king. the timing of this is a beautiful thing. it is on the new york times best-seller list. i really do love this. i love you. >> i love you, sue. thank you for your work. i really appreciate you. tavis: it is a love fest. that is our show for
PBS
Dec 25, 2012 4:00pm PST
fragments remains. it came down close to the city of shymkent. >> a plane has crash landed on a road in burma. two died and 11 were injured when the aircraft came down three kilometers short of its intended destination. here is our report. >> a burned-out shell now lying in a field. this was an aircraft flying an internal route popular with terrorists. the plane crashed into a rice field just before 9:00 a.m. local time. it was en route from the old capital to heho, which is the gateway place to the lake. one of the passengers told the bbc how they circled the airport before they tried to land. >> we went in those clouds, and suddenly we crashed. we just hit the ground, and then it was all red, and orange, and smoke came. then we saw some fire. then the steward he is opened the emergency exit. we thought it better to get out as soon as possible before it might explode. >> there had been 65 passengers and six crew on board. investigators are trying to determine the exact cause of the crash. some reports suggest an engine fire. the fatalities include a motor cyclist on the ground. the
PBS
Nov 30, 2012 4:00pm PST
will take a look. >> the center of mexico city is on lockdown. hours to go before he is officially sworn in as president, it has been put in place outside of parliamentary buildings for days. >> i know that the president -- >> the president-elect has been making friends north of the border. in washington, he assured president obama he was proposing a new security strategy to try to reduce the drug-related violence that marked his predecessor's time in office. far from the white house is the tourist resort. the only political experience before winning the presidency was his government here. it is one of the projects he is remembered fondly for in the town as well as building a new infrastructure. his friend and political allies have rejected the suggestion that the president is all style and no substance. >> he is a very straightforward man, very committed with an excellent vision of the country , an excellent statement, and he knows how to listen. dodge a municipality on the outskirts of mexico city where the tentacles of the drug violence have started to reach. it is a particular proble
PBS
Dec 6, 2012 4:00pm PST
. only a few roads are available. and going out of the city into the suburban areas that are held by the free syrian army. what you can see is a deterioration in the position of the regime and the strain of war as well. will that result in and trying to somehow do a deal? i do not know. but i know that a political deal is the only real choice the syrians have. if they do not get that, they face a long and bloody war. >> today, we have the american and russian foreign ministers meeting with the u.n. envoy to syria at a conference in ireland. russia has been a key player. do you understand whether the russians are getting closer to a western position when it comes to assad's future? >> if they are common their remarks from the meeting did not seem to suggest that they were prepared to go the extra mile or make some kind of deal. the issue is the fact that the u.n. security council is paralyzed. paralyzed over this whole issue of syria. the western countries have one position. russia and china have another. both sides actually need to move. holding on to positions that do not work. a
PBS
Dec 7, 2012 2:30pm PST
"middleton," similar to "city island." arturo wrote the music for it. we are good buddies. tavis: let me go back to the story of the movie, "a dark truth." you play a talk show host that is a former cia agent. did you ever imagine yourself, given your views on the world, being -- >> cia? tavis: being a political talk show host. >> no, no. tavis: you do have views, though. >> we all have views. i choose to live my life as a bomb maker, as an artist. that is what i am interested -- as a filmmaker, as an artist. that is what i am interested in. we all have political views. we are interested in how the world affairs, and how we treat each other as human beings. but the political scene has no interest to me. people try to suck you in. unfortunately, i have an situations where there have been statements out there, in this modern day of the internet, when people were making statements as though you were making them. i had to shut down 6 facebook pages making statements i have never made. how you control that? there is no respect about each other's privacy. it is a free-for-all. i am sure you have
PBS
Dec 7, 2012 4:00pm PST
is that the city center. armed rebels are in parts of the ring around damascus. this is one of them. the rebels to film to this, and any civilians who have not escaped, have been shelled in the last few days. they keep the rebels back from this strong. . bbc was invited in to visit the detention center run by air force intelligence. we were not allowed to see the cellblocks. human rights groups say torture happens here. they paraded six prisoners. they said they were not speaking underdressed. the governor said any doubters were making the wrong assumptions about syria's secular state. syrian state tv was in the room to film. none of the men had been in court. all have confessed to being in al qaeda-style groups. >> the main work is making explosive devices to plant. >> they produce the algerian passport of this person, who said he was also a french citizen. >> i decided to do something for the children of syria, for the families and the powerless. i decided to join the jihad rather than crying in front of my tv. >> he would not answer when i asked if he had been tortured. two said there were p
PBS
Dec 11, 2012 4:00pm PST
. the middle east editor is in damascus and sent this report on the battle for an increasingly divided city. >> damascus is at the heart of the bloodiest arab uprising. they keep them under tight security that squeezes traffic down the main road. the capitals still functions. but the battle for damascus is under way. it is happening in the suburbs after months of shelling and air strikes. it is controlled by the rebels the claim they own about one- third of greater damascus. the rebels only have pockets of ground. these were blocks of flats. all sides should distinguish between civilians hiding. almost every building is damaged, which suggests is being treated as a military target. >> they sought a bomb and a barrel of explosives dropped from the helicopter. the blitz is breaking the city and breaking lives. it isn't breaking with the president's enemies. >> they have shown that they have the stomach for a fight. they can endure pain and they have the conviction that if they don't, they will be killed. the question for them is what more they will have to do. the fighters showed off what the
PBS
Dec 14, 2012 2:30pm PST
of the city since the cleveland clinic which i am proud of. people around the world literally do anything they can to get to the cleveland clinic. as one who was born and raised in cleveland, how does it feel to work at this institution? >> it is phenomenal. cleveland is a comeback city and to work at an institution that is number one in so many areas, we're number one in gynecology, no. 3 in the country. our heart institution is number one and it is a unique opportunity giveback. the institution is one in which it has been at the forefront for many things. we do not hire smokers. we got rid of unhealthy things. we want to set an example and positions want to set an example. we're trying to empower patients and make them take ownership of self care reform. not to be passive about your health. we want people to live like many parts in the world to 100 and the biggest thing i would say that if you were healthy at age 50, you are likely to live to age 80. if you're healthy at 65, you are unlikely to live to age 90. if you are healthy at 70 you are likely to live to 100 years of age. we want
PBS
Dec 28, 2012 7:30pm PST
, but in silicon valley, the highly anticipated facebook ipo fell flat. the city of stockton made headlines as the largest city in the u.s. to ever file for bankruptcy. and a deadly shooting at oikos university in oakland left seven people dead and a community in shock. and obama care was given the seal of approval by the u.s. supreme court, now poised to take on prop 8 and the defense of marriage act. california's high-speed rail stayed on track but just barely. the controversial bullet train came under fire from many sides with funding still in question. the state parks were saved from closing but suffered another setback when an unused surplus of millions of dollars was discovered sitting in a secret account. and there was also excitement. the golden gate bridge celebrated its 75th anniversary, and a new bay bridge neared completion. the mars curiosity captured our attention and imagination, turning thoughts to the possibility of life on other planets. and with their backs against the wall, the san francisco giants refused to die, bringing home their second world series championship in t
PBS
Dec 1, 2012 12:00am PST
communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> we shall go on to the end. we shall fight in france. we shall fight on the seas and oceans. we shall fight with growing confidence and growing strength in the air. we shall defend our island, whatever the cost may be. we shall fight on the beaches. we shall fight on the landing grounds. we shall fight in the fields and in the streets. we shall fight in the hills. we shall never surrender. >> rose: winston church sill recognized as one of the greatest statesmen of all times. in 1954 edward r. murrow the cbs newsman said he mobilized the english language and sent it into battle. president kennedy liked the quote so much that he used it as his own. that was in 1963 when he granted winston churchill honorary citizenship of the united states. >> pierpont morgan was a friend of churchill's mother and is likely that winston on one of his many trip to its united states would have visited this library. we're joined today by alan packwood, he is the director of the churchill archive center in cambridge. and he's cure rating an ex
PBS
Dec 17, 2012 3:00pm PST
and they don't belong in the streets of our city. >> woodruff: we assess the public policy questions raised by the shooting about access to guns, mental health issues, and more. >> ifill: hari sreenivasan reports from newtown on a community in mourning. >> woodruff: and as parents around the country nervously dropped their children off at school today, jeffrey brown talks to a psychiatrist and a school psychologist about what to say and not to say in times of crisis. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and friends of the newshour. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: a holiday season that should have
PBS
Dec 12, 2012 3:00pm PST
,013. indianapolis will be the first major american city to replace all city-owned cars with electric and plug-in hybrid vehicles. the program announced today calls for completing the switch by 2025. the city also plans to phase in fire trucks and other heavy vehicles that run on compressed natural gas. officials said they're asking auto makers to create plug-in hybrid police cars, which don't yet exist. retiring u.s. senator joe lieberman said goodbye to the senate today, with an appeal for principled compromise. he warned that gridlock is preventing progress on a host of problems. lieberman ran as the democratic vice presidential nominee in 2000. all told, he spent 24 years in the senate, first as a democrat, and since 2006, as an independent. a pantheon of music legends takes the stage tonight in new york, raising money for those hit hardest by hurricane sandy. the program for the "12-12-12" concert includes paul mccartney, bruce springsteen, the rolling stones, kanye west and alicia keys, among many others. the concert and telethon could reach two billion people on radio and t.v., in movi
PBS
Dec 29, 2012 12:00am PST
captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: master ricardo muti is here, one of the world's great conductors. he has lead some of the best orchestras including the vienna philharmonic, he is currently music director of the chicago symphony orchestra, critics and audiences alike have been dazzled and charmed by the intensity, the technique, the emotion that he and his musicians bring. here is a look at a performance of verdi's requiem. >> when you look at the journey of your life, from the violin, piano, goesing, conducting, is that the perfect sign of flow for someone who wants to lead a great orchestra? >> first i didn't want to be a musician. so the first quality, i mean the first, if you don't want something and you get it. and but i studied very seriously but fortunately-- . >> rose: what did you want to be, do. >> first my father was a medical doctor. we are five brothers. and he wanted one to be a doctor, one to be an architect, one to-- my profession was opposed to become a lawyer, that would have been a disast
PBS
Dec 4, 2012 12:00am PST
ós captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >>. >> getting ready. >>. >> by military forces it would be some change in the chemical weapons whether they wanted to move them or whether they plan if syrians have always said they will not use these weapons on their own people. do they now -- go ahead. >> that's right and president obama in august clearly delineated those red lines that if they were to move these out of their storage site or to employ them against the syrian people or anyone else that would be a trigger point for some type of western action. now, depending -- the pentagon has drawn up preliminary plans to send as many as 75,000 troops into syria to secure these chemical weapons sites, but as of just today there have been no signs that any of those forces have been put on alert or there was any detail planning to do this. so there was some question here of whether assad may be calling t president's bluff. >> rose: and what exactly do you think they would be prepared to do and what would trigger that? clearly t
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